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Depend® Adjustable Underwear

Depend® Adjustable Underwear
  • Four side tabs securely close after perforated sides are opened. They adjust for a snug, comfortable custom fit.
  • Side perforations can be opened for easy changing, even with your pants and shoes on. Perforations can also be left closed, allowing Adjustable Underwear to be slipped on and off.

Product Overview

Underwear with Maximum absorbency designed for discreet changing without having to remove your pants and shoes – at home or on the go. Adjustable Underwear features perforated sides that neatly tear open with four prefastened tabs to securely close for a snug, underwear-like fit. Offers worry-free odor control.

Style - Easy to change garment
SizeWaistWeight
S/M28-45 in100-190 lbs
L/XL44-64 in170-300 lbs
 

Customer Reviews

Rated 3.5 out of 5 by 14reviewers.
Rated 5 out of 5 #1 and #2 this diaper is honestly quite comfy. it feels smooth and tight. I have no control over my bladder or bowel and this diaper holds in a lot of my urine, also if my stomach cramps, and I know what is coming, I feel confident my mess will not go anywhere other than the seat of my diaper. I was at a wedding and I had to go #1 and #2 and I felt them both coming, almost simultaneously I wet and messed myself, but this diaper held them both In with no leaks or drips. im 17 and sitting in my own urine and mess is the last thing I wanna do, but this diaper makes the experience much more enjoyable. thanks depends! July 31, 2014
Rated 5 out of 5 The best ever I wear these diapers for bed-wetting and they are the best ones yet! I have NEVER had even ONE leak. It is also breathable and has a great discreet fit which I love! I will use these until my bed-wetting stops. August 4, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 by best fit and comfort I like how these are breathable. I have used a regular diaper and have had rashes. With the adjustable underwear, they are quiet and my skin can breathe. I have been using them a long time and enjoy the comfort. Great job depend keep up the great work. May 29, 2013
Rated 5 out of 5 The best product it keep you dry all the time with no leaks at all would buy more May 13, 2013
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Maximum S/M 4.3 5 14 20
It passes the winter in the Southern states as an adult butterfly, probably hidden away in cracks under the bark of trees or elsewhere. When spri He is true to his country and his God. Another scout virtue is cheerfulness. As the scout law intimates, he must never go about with a sulky air. He must always be bright and smiling, and as the humorist says, "Must always see the doughnut and not the hole. A bright face and a cheery word spread like sunshine from one to another. It is the scout's duty to be a sunshine-maker in the world. Another scout virtue is that of thoughtfulness, especially to animals; not merely the thoughtfulness that eases a horse from the pain of a badly fitting harness or gives food and drink to an animal that is in need, but also that which keeps a boy from throwing a stone at a cat or tying a tin can on a dog's tail. If a boy scout does not prove his thoughtfulness and friendship for animals, it is quite certain that he never will be really helpful to his comrades or to the men, women, and children who may need his care. And then the final and chief test of the scout is the doing of a good turn to somebody every day, quietly and without boasting. This is the proof of the scout. It is practical religion, and a boy honors God best when he helps others most. A boy may wear all the scout uniforms made, all the scout badges ever manufactured, know all the woodcraft, campcraft, scoutcraft and other activities of boy scouts, and yet never be a real boy scout. To be a real boy scout means the doing of a good turn every day with the proper motive and if this be done, the boy has a right to be classed with the great scouts that have been of such service to their country. To accomplish this a scout should observe the scout law. Every boy ought to commit to memory the following abbreviated form of the Scout law. Every scout knows what rope is. From the earliest moment of his play life he has used it in connection with most of his games. In camp life and on hikes he will be called upon to use it again and again. It is therefore not essential to describe here the formation of rope; its various sizes and strength. The important thing to know is how to use it to the best advantage. April 24, 2012
Thus our so-called glass-snake, common in the Southern states, is not a snake at all, but a lizard, as we may easily see by ob Along in early August they will be seen at the summer resorts in the Catskill Mountains, and by the end of October they will have traveled far down into the Southern states where they pass the winter. The caterpillar of the monarch or milkweed butterfly is a very striking creature. It is nearly two inches long when full grown. Its head is yellow striped with black; its body is white with narrow black and yellow cross-stripes on each segment. On the back of the second segment of the thorax there is a pair of black, whiplash-like filaments, and on the eighth joint there is a similar shorter pair. When this caterpillar gets ready to transform to chrysalis, it hangs itself up by its tail end, the skin splits and gradually draws back, and the chrysalis itself is revealed--pale pea-green in color with golden spots. Anyone by hunting over a patch of milkweed anywhere in the United States during the summer is quite apt to find these caterpillars feeding. It will be easy to watch them and to see them transform, and eventually to get the butterfly. The same thing may be done with anyone of the six hundred and fifty-two different kinds of butterflies in the United States. Fishes may be roughly classified as fresh water, migratory between fresh and salt water, and marine. Among the families of American fresh-water fishes that are conspicuous on account of their size, abundance, or economic importance, or all of these, there may be mentioned the sturgeons, the catfishes, the suckers, the minnows or carps, the pikes, the killifishes, the trouts, salmons, and whitefishes, the perches, and the basses, and sun fishes. The migratory fishes fall into two groups, the anadromous and the catadtomous. The anadromous fishes pass most of their lives in the sea, run up stream only for the purpose of spawning, and constitute the most valuable of our river fishes. In this group are the shads and the alewives or river herrings, the white perch, the striped bass or rock fish, some of the sturgeons, and the Atlantic salmon, all of which go back to sea after spawning, and the Pacific salmons (five species), all of which die after spawning. Of the catadromous fishes there is a single example in our waters--the common eel. It spends most of its life in the fresh waters and sometimes becomes permanently landlocked there, and runs down to the sea to spawn, laying its eggs off shore in deep water. The study of living fishes is most entertaining and is rendered somewhat difficult by the medium in which they live, by their fishyness, and by the necessity of approaching closely in order to obtain any accurate view. The spawning, feeding, swimming and other habits of very few of our fishes are so well known that further information thereon is not needed; and the boy scout's patience, skill, and powers of observation will be reflected in the records that may be and should be kept about the different fishes met with. April 24, 2012
While many of the fishes in a given section are eas By the end of June or July some of these Southern butterflies have found their way north into Canada and begin the return flight southward. Along in early August they will be seen at the summer resorts in the Catskill Mountains, and by the end of October they will have traveled far down into the Southern states where they pass the winter. The caterpillar of the monarch or milkweed butterfly is a very striking creature. It is nearly two inches long when full grown. Its head is yellow striped with black; its body is white with narrow black and yellow cross-stripes on each segment. On the back of the second segment of the thorax there is a pair of black, whiplash-like filaments, and on the eighth joint there is a similar shorter pair. When this caterpillar gets ready to transform to chrysalis, it hangs itself up by its tail end, the skin splits and gradually draws back, and the chrysalis itself is revealed--pale pea-green in color with golden spots. Anyone by hunting over a patch of milkweed anywhere in the United States during the summer is quite apt to find these caterpillars feeding. It will be easy to watch them and to see them transform, and eventually to get the butterfly. The same thing may be done with anyone of the six hundred and fifty-two different kinds of butterflies in the United States. Fishes may be roughly classified as fresh water, migratory between fresh and salt water, and marine. Among the families of American fresh-water fishes that are conspicuous on account of their size, abundance, or economic importance, or all of these, there may be mentioned the sturgeons, the catfishes, the suckers, the minnows or carps, the pikes, the killifishes, the trouts, salmons, and whitefishes, the perches, and the basses, and sun fishes. The migratory fishes fall into two groups, the anadromous and the catadtomous. April 24, 2012
The poison glands are situated at the point of the lower jaw, a In this group are the shads and the alewives or river herrings, the white perch, the striped bass or rock fish, some of the sturgeons, and the Atlantic salmon, all of which go back to sea after spawning, and the Pacific salmons (five species), all of which die after spawning. Of the catadromous fishes there is a single example in our waters--the common eel. It spends most of its life in the fresh waters and sometimes becomes permanently landlocked there, and runs down to the sea to spawn, laying its eggs off shore in deep water. The study of living fishes is most entertaining and is rendered somewhat difficult by the medium in which they live, by their fishyness, and by the necessity of approaching closely in order to obtain any accurate view. April 24, 2012
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